When an Ingrown Toenail Requires Help From Your Podiatrist

Ingrown toenails are common, affecting as many as 18% of adults in the United States at some point in their life. You may try alleviating the discomfort caused by your ingrown toenail at home.

However, if your home remedies fail to alleviate the swelling and tenderness within 2-3 days, then it’s time to get help from our expert podiatrists at Optima Foot and Ankle in Bend and Redmond, Oregon. Waiting too long increases your risk of developing an infection that requires more serious interventions. 

How did I get an ingrown toenail?

Normally, your toenails grow straight out from your nail bed. If the front edge or side of your toenail curves in and grows into your skin, you have an ingrown toenail. 

An ingrown toenail may develop from many causes, including:

The painful toenail condition may affect any of your toes, but most often affects the big toe. 

The early signs and symptoms of an ingrown toenail

Your initial ingrown toenail symptoms may be mild, causing a twinge of discomfort when you move or squeeze the affected toenail. You may dismiss these symptoms, but early recognition and treatment at this stage may prevent further health complications. 

We recommend at-home treatments, such as:

Whatever you do, don’t attempt any “bathroom surgery.” What we mean is, don’t cut your nail or nailbed in an attempt to restore normal growth of your toenail. 

When your ingrown toenail needs help from your podiatrist

If your ingrown toenail fails to improve within 2-3 days of at-home care or your symptoms worsen, you need to contact us so we can help. You also need podiatric intervention if your ingrown toenail is infected. 

Signs and symptoms of an infection include:

If you have diabetes or another medical condition that reduces circulation in your feet, you’re more prone to developing infections. In such cases, we recommend you skip the at-home care and come in to see us as soon as you develop any signs or symptoms of an ingrown toenail.

Preventing an ingrown toenail

Though genetics may make you more prone to developing an ingrown toenail, improper nail trimming is the most common cause of ingrown toenails, according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. You may be able to prevent an ingrown toenail by:

Ingrown toenails should be treated as soon as they become a noticeable problem. There’s no need to just grin and bear it when we can help. Contact us by phone or online to schedule your consultation.

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